Spiders

Black-Widow

Black Widow

Female black widows are about ½” long, black with a red hourglass marking on their underside. Webs are irregular. One egg sac can carry 150 eggs (disperse through ballooning). Their bites are toxic. If bitten, seek medical attention.


Brown-Recluse

Brown Recluse

Bites can be deadly to humans. The venomous brown recluse, with a dark brown fiddle-shaped marking is about ½” long. They feed upon soft-bodied insects. They hunt prey at night. At sunup, they drag their food to spun, irregular, off-white webs in dark, secluded areas. Can live up to 3 years. If bitten, seek medical attention.


Daddy-Long-Leg

Daddy Long Leg

Daddy Long Legs are NOT spiders (or even insects) at all! They are part of the Arachnid family, but in a different class. They are, infact, called Harvestmen. They have 3 body sections, not two like spiders, and their legs have seven sections which they can break off to surprise or distract a predator.


Hobo-Spider

Hobo Spider

The Hobo is ⅜ – ⅝” long with long legs. Sometimes difficult to distinguish from the common house spider. Bite is similar to Brown Recluse bite and can be deadly. Makes a funnel web, which is not used to capture prey. If bitten, seek medical attention.


Jumping-Spider

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spiders are generally active hunters, which means that they do not, as a rule, rely on a web to catch their prey. They use their superior eyesight to distinguish and track their intended meals, often for several inches. They pounce and administer a venomous bite.


Wolf-Spider

Wolf Spider

They’re large, brown, and hairy ranging from ½ – 2” in length. They look much scarier than they actually are. Wolf Spiders aren’t typically associated with webs. Inside homes, they often hang out near windows, doors, house plants, or storage areas.